In early 2016  I spent a week at the PCS intensive outpatient program to deal with some personal issues.  I knew that staying in a hotel by myself might be a difficult environment so when I heard about Camelback and talked to Tim I felt Camelback would provide a safe place for me to come back to at the end of a very long day; and boy was I right!  Not only is the house convenient to the center of Scottsdale, it is also immaculately clean and quiet.  Best of all though was the house manager, Richard, who was such a caring person to come home to at the end of the day.  He prepared hot home cooked meals within minutes of my return and was incredibly flexible with my schedule.  It was also really nice to have someone to talk to if I wanted.   

All in all it was a great experience and I would definitely stay there again if I have the opportunity.

Ned L.  – Philadelphia, Pa

There is no shortcut to life. To the end of our days, life is a lesson imperfectly learned.

–Harrison E. Salisbury

There are no perfect days. We have struggled hard against this truth. In our demanding ways, we haven’t wanted life to be a process; we have wanted to reach a secure point of arrival. We have struggled against the dialogue and learning process of experience. We’ve looked for a “fix” and for perfection. Even now in recovery we long to “get it right.” We continue to learn and to grow, but the lessons we learn are not the things we expected. We grieve the lateness of our learning, and then we go on to learn more.

As we grow in this program, we learn how to learn. We become more accepting of life as a process with no shortcut to the truth. We learn to engage in the process and accept that there usually is no right or wrong answer at the end of our search.

Today, may I accept the truth, which comes from the lessons of my experience — and be tolerant of its incompleteness.

Staying at Camelback Recovery while attending the PCS Intensive allowed me to really dive into recovery. Beautiful, clean, and safe home…and the House Manager is one heck of a cook too! Thank you! 

John S. – Scottsdale, Arizona

I wanted to share with you the very positive experience I had when I stayed at Camelback Recovery House.  To start with, like many suffering with addictions, being isolated is a big trigger for me. Having the support network within the actual living facility was indispensable. The house manager, Richard, is an incredibly humble, likable and respectful person to deal with. His caring conversations, polite demeanor and honest attitude is soothing and made me feel very welcomed from the start.  He also cooked dinner every night which was a huge benefit, without incurring an additional charge to the weekly rate, I may add.  There were plenty of snacks, breakfast food and lunch options to choose from, and again, at no additional charge.  The camaraderie amongst the other tenants was also a major benefit.  There were people there at different stages of recovery which lead to interesting, yet pro-recovery, conversations, as well as general conversations, that I certainly wouldn’t have had the opportunity to enjoy if I stayed in a hotel room by myself.  The general attitude of “we’re all in this together” amongst everyone was refreshing to say the least.  One of the tenants even gave me a ride to my therapy on two separate mornings when I had to be there at 7am. One of the mornings he didn’t even have to work and gave me a ride out of the goodness of his heart at that super-early time!  Regarding the actual house itself, it is an updated home, clean, well-maintained, in a good neighborhood and it gave me a great sense of familiarity versus the often cold “feel” to a standalone hotel room.  The bed was comfortable, the bathroom was updated and modern and overall I was very pleased with the “hominess” it provided.  Overall, my experience was nothing but positive.  I didn’t know what to expect on my way to Scottsdale, and quite honestly, I was pretty concerned about what the living situation might be when I got there.  What I found was an exceptional house, great people and safe environment that enabled honest and open discussion, or no discussion at all, that in my mind, was critical to my own personal recovery. 

Thanks,

Patrick G.

Tampa, FL