Be grateful for where you are now.

“It doesn’t take as much faith to believe that everything happens for a reason as it does to embrace the belief that I am who and where I am now, today, for a reason – even if I don’t know what that reason is and even if I don’t particularly like who or where I am today,” a friend said to me.

“When I can take that in, my dissatisfaction and negativity disappear, and I can proceed calmly and gratefully with my life. To me,” he said, “that’s what spirituality is all about.”

Faith and hope aren’t just for the future. Try using them on today.

Could it be that you’re who you are and where you are now for a reason? Thank God for your life, exactly as it is, right now.

God, give me enough faith to believe in today.

I agree with this 1000%! Everything happens for a reason and everything happens exactly the way it’s supposed to. There are no coincidences. A gentleman moved into our sober living home yesterday, and it turns out that his girlfriend was the listing agent for the office that I leased several years ago. I was at the sober living house today, and the owner of the office building that I leased road by on his bike. I have not seen him in years. I’m not sure what that means, or if it even means anything. I leased out one of my homes to a couple of women a few years ago, and it turned out that they were in recovery. Shortly after that they turned my home into a sober living home for women. That was about the same time that I was getting out of the vacation rental business and I was trying to figure out what I was going to do next with my life. That is what opened up my eyes to the possibility of getting into the sober living business. Now I own my own recovery business. I am a firm believer that everything happens for a reason and there are no coincidences. I am grateful that I have the faith that everything works out the way it’s supposed to.

We believe in Human Ecology, the understanding and care of human beings as whole persons in light of their relationship to God, themselves, their families, and the society in which they live.

–The Philosophy of Human Ecology

The philosophy of Human Ecology covers all three aspects of our recovery: body, mind, and spirit.

We know that taking care of our bodies is essential to recovery. That means eating properly, exercising as much as we can, and not abusing ourselves physically.

Taking care of our minds is also important. We are trying to make choices that enhance our recovery, not diminish it. This includes the things we read, watch, and listen to. We seek out education and positive affirmation. We go to meetings. We gather with others who share our vision.

Spirituality is the common thread through all of this, for without it we are lost. Our spiritual search is our effort to improve our conscious contact with God. Through this search comes harmony of body, mind, and spirit.

Today let me remember the principles of Human Ecology. They provide a simple reminder of where I’ve been and where I am going.

Taking care of my mind, body, and spirit has been very important to my recovery from substance abuse addiction. I pray, meditate, and create a gratitude list every morning. I go to 12 step meetings almost daily. I speak with my sponsor and other friends in recovery daily. My normal practice is to exercise and eat healthy on a daily basis. I sponsor guys. I share at 12 step meetings. I have a normal sleeping schedule and I live a balanced life. All of these things contribute to my recovery and contribute to me being happy, joyous, and free. All of these things help me to be spiritually fit. Thanks to my recovery and Alcoholics Anonymous, my life is amazing today!

Self-pity in its early stages is as snug as a feather mattress. Only when it hardens does it become uncomfortable.

–Maya Angelou

Some days we grasp at self-pity like a blanket on a cold night, and we are momentarily comforted. However, extended periods of self-pity will undermine our primary purpose, which is to be at peace with ourselves and others so that we may know freedom from our addictions. Thus our self-pity prevents us from carrying a message of hope to fellow sufferers, that they too can find release from their suffering through the Twelve Steps.

Staying clean and sober are gifts available to all of us when we cultivate gratitude. We can be grateful for this program that has brought manageability and serenity to our life, and that leaves us little room for self-pity, anger, or impatience. Our mind will be willing and open to receive God’s guidance and support when we let go of our self-pity.

Today I will stay free of self-pity so I can receive God’s strength.

Great reading, this is just what I needed this morning. I am so full of gratitude for my life today. I am grateful to be sober, grateful that I am health and fit, grateful for my friends in recovery, and grateful that I have learned that I am powerless over not just alcohol, but also people, places, and things. Anytime I start feeling sorry for myself, I just need to open my eyes and look at other people and their life circumstances. I have plenty of money, clothes on my back, food to eat, and a nice place to live. My problems today are luxury problems. Being in gratitude contributes to my happiness, being present contributes to my happiness, being open and willing contributes to my happiness. Life is definitely not perfect for me. However, I am happier than I have ever been staying away from self-pity leads me to being happy, joyous, and free.

I am still amazed, after years of recovering, at how easily I can begin to talk myself out of attending meetings. I am also still amazed at how good I feel when I go.

–Anonymous

 

We don’t have to stay stuck in our misery and discomfort. An immediate option is available that will help us feel better: go to a meeting, a Twelve Step support group.

 

Why resist what can help us feel better? Why sit in our obsession or depression when attending a meeting – even if that means an extra meeting – would help us feel better?

 

Too busy?

 

There are 168 hours in each week. Taking 1 or 2 hours a week for a meeting can maximize the potential of the remaining 166 hours. If we get into our “codependent stuff,” we can easily spend a majority of our waking hours obsessing, sitting and doing nothing, lying in bed and feeling depressed, or chasing after other people’s needs. Not taking those 2 hours for a meeting can cause us to waste the remaining hours.

 

Too tired?

 

There is nothing as invigorating as getting back on track. Going to a meeting can accomplish that.

 

Today, I will remember that going to meetings helps.

 

I always feel better after I go to a 12-step meeting. When I don’t want to go to a 12-step meeting, that means I should probably go to a meeting. For example, I got into an argument with my girlfriend the other day and she ended up storming out of my house. The thoughts in my head tell me that it’s all her fault. I think that she is being ridiculous and how dare her! Left to my own devices, I will continue to think it is all her fault. However, I went to a meeting and heard exactly what I needed to hear. I realized that the things I said were totally out of line and that I was being totally selfish and self-centered. She was not doing what I wanted her to do. Therefore, I started picking at her and making her feel bad. This was old behavior for me. I ended up feeling bad all day long the next day. I felt bad because my side of the street was not clean. Going to a meeting helped me realize my part and it helped me realize that I owed her an amends. I made an amends to her, and felt a lot better afterwards. I always hear what I need to hear when I go to a meeting.